Courses

ENGL 600 Literary Theory (3): Focuses on the analysis of the relevant schools and methods of contemporary literary theory as practiced in current literary journals and books, as well as the application of those schools and methods to academic writing.

ENGL 601 History of the English Language (3): This course surveys the development of the English language from its origins to modern day English. Students will gain an understanding of the historical and social developments that shaped and continue to shape the English language. Students will also gain an understanding of the sounds, spelling, and grammar of the language as it has developed and be able to describe the changes in English pronunciation, writing, vocabulary, and sentence structure across time and place.

ENGL 602 Seminar in Fiction (3): A study of fiction as a genre, with emphasis on the process of reading and interpreting novels and short stories and on the development of the genre.

ENGL 603 Seminar in Poetry (3): A study of poetry as a genre, with emphasis on the process of reading and interpreting poems and on the means by which a poem creates its meanings.

ENGL 604 Seminar in Drama (3): A study of the genre of drama with emphasis on the interpretation of types of plays from different periods. Related dramatic criticism is also studied.

ENGL 605 Figures in Literature (3): Extended study in the work of from one to three writers of a given time and/or tradition.

ENGL 606 Introduction to Graduate Studies in English (3): Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of program chair required.This course is the required introductory course for graduate studies in English and should be taken in the first fall semester of a student's graduate program. It introduces students to the type and level of work required for graduate study in English, including: the use of bibliographic materials, research methods and resources, and methods of presenting research. It may include readings and assignments preparatory to work in both critical and creative writing courses, but will emphasize the use and documentation of sources used in literary scholarship and the presentation of the material orally and in print in preparation for the successful completion and defense of a master's thesis in ENGL 699.

ENGL 610 Thornton Writing Seminar (3): This course in writing is taught by the Writer-in-Residence. Enrollment is limited to specially selected students; prospective enrollees should apply to the Thornton Committee and be prepared to submit writing samples for admittance. The course is usually structured as a workshop and may be repeated for credit if the specific title and instructors are different. Students taking the class for graduate credit will be expected to compose a portfolio of original work to be submitted for publication.

ENGL 616 Special Topics in English (3): Intensive study of a problem or topic or a detailed examination of a single author’s work. Topics will vary according to professor and term offered.

ENGL 623 Multicultural Literature (3): Exploration of different cultures and literatures, the effects of culture on perspective, the historical self-concepts of different peoples, and other peoples’ attitudes toward America, using such writers from around the world as Milan Kundera, Fae Myenne Ng, Chinua Achebe, and Sandra Cisneros.

ENGL 647 Religion and Literature (3): Examines how religious institutions, concepts, and values have been presented in and challenged within literary works. The course may take as its emphasis a given time period and/or religious tradition. Readings may include works by authors from various religious communities as well as recent theoretical work by scholars working in the field of religion and literature.

ENGL 648 Gender and Literature (3): Focuses on representations of women and men, constructions of femininity and masculinity, and sexual politics while engaging with current debates regarding the materials and methods of literary studies of sex and gender. Major issues include questions of canon and canonicity, difference, equality, sexuality, constructions of gender, intersections of gender with race, class, and nationality, and the role of reading and writing in processes of social change.

ENGL 649 Transnational Literature (3): Study of literary movements, traditions, and legacies across national borders and continents.

ENGL 650 The Craft of Poetic Forms (3): Examination of the creative process of poetic forms from the perspectives of aesthetics and techniques, illustrated from the work of selected authors, culminating in directed creative individual projects.

ENGL 651 The Craft of Narrative Prose (3): Examination of the creative process of narrative prose from the perspectives of aesthetics and techniques, illustrated from the work of selected authors, culminating in directed creative individual projects.

ENGL 652 The Craft of Lyrical Prose (3): Examination of the creative process of lyrical prose from the perspectives of aesthetics and techniques, illustrated from the work of selected authors, culminating in directed creative individual projects.

ENGL 670 Independent Study (3): Prerequisite: Special permission is required. Provides for the pursuit of individual interests and projects not covered in existing courses. These courses may be repeated if subjects of study vary.

ENGL 699: Research and Thesis (3): This course provides students the opportunity to do extensive research on a topic of particular interest, culminating in the writing and defense of a thesis under a faculty director and a committee.