Course Descriptions

MST 101  Introduction to Museum Studies (3 hours)

A survey of the history, mission, methods, contemporary applications, and future roles of museums. 

MST 102 The Great American Museum (1 hour)

This course focuses on one significant American museum through the examination of its history, mission, interpretation of its collection, and current educational and social roles. The course includes travel to that museum over fall break.

MST 201 Curatorial Practice (3 hours)

This course focuses on the identification and understanding of tangible objects within the historical perspective, their relevance for and use by museums of all types, and the application of curatorial methodology and care of collections. Historical, artistic, decorative, and scientific objects will be examined for authenticity, composition, history, and value. The Daura Gallery will be used as a teaching resource.

MST 201 Docent Practice (1 hour)

The museum docent practicum is a one-credit experience in which students learn about the docent (academically-trained volunteer) preparation and experience in museums, and specific content of an exhibition in the Daura Gallery (temporary or permanent), culminating in the practical exercise of giving public tours. The course is an opportunity for students to prepare for both professional and volunteer work in museums.

MST 301 Legal & Ethical Issues in Museum Studies (3 hours, LCSR)

An examination of the ethical and legal issues of governance, administration and collections management facing museums in the new millennium.  

MST 302 Museums in the Public Dimension (3 hours)

Prerequisite: MST 101 or permission of the instructor. A course focusing on the theory and practice of museum education, exhibitions, and programming.  As part of this course, students will curate an exhibition for the Daura Gallery.

MST 304 Historical Archaeology (3 hours)

The archaeology field school at Historic Sandusky provides a foundation in current methods and theories of historical archaeology, and offers a solid introduction to the practical skills of site survey, excavation, recording, and laboratory procedures.  Because Sandusky is a public site, students will also participate in interpreting archaeology to the public.

MST 305 Understanding the Historic House Museum as Public History (3 hours)

America’s cultural heritage can be found in its people and its buildings. Preservation of social and cultural history is embodied in historic buildings. What does it take to preserve, restore, and interpret the authentic past to the public? This course that will provide an awareness and knowledge of the rich complexity of details and issues associated with the architectural restoration and public interpretation of historic properties.

MST 377 Study Abroad, International Museums (3 hours)

Prerequisite: MST 101 or permission of the instructor. This course develops an integrated world view, recognizes the necessity of multiple disciplinary perspectives to address complex human issues, problems, and themes that effect the world community, and enhances the students’ knowledge and understanding of cultural patrimony, cultural heritage, and the varied roles of museums throughout the world through study abroad to museums in Europe, Asia, Africa, North America outside the U.S., or South America.

MST 397 Independent Study (1-3 hours)

Prerequisite: MST 101; junior or senior museum studies minors. This course is individualized, research-based independent study and thesis for upper division museum studies students who wish to pursue advanced study in museum studies or a specialized field. The area of investigation is developed in consultation with a faculty sponsor and credit is dependent on the nature of the work. May be repeated for no more than six credits.

MST 398 Special Topics in Museum Studies (1-3 hours, credit depends on topic)

Prerequisite: A background of work in the discipline. This course will focus on an aspect of the discipline not otherwise covered by regularly offered courses. The topic will vary according to professor and term; consequently,  more than one may be taken by a student during his/her matriculation.

MST 399 Internship in Museum Studies (3-6 hours)

Prerequisite: Junior or senior museum studies minors, 2.25 GPA, and a faculty adviser/sponsor. Internships provide students with practical educational experience outside of the classroom, in museums, galleries, historic sites and science centers appropriately related to the student's major and career objectives.

The SOBE Difference

Video player showing image of business students working together
  • Strong sense of belonging
  • Small student-centered classes
  • Be a name, not a number
  • Active student clubs and organizations
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Emphasis on real-world applications
  • Use of competitive simulations
  • Technology-intensive courses
  • Practical ethics training
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  • Be mentored by faculty
  • Meet with faculty outside of class
  • Student-faculty collaborative research opportunities
  • Strong academic support provided
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Alumni networking opportunities
  • Leadership development via experiential internships
  • International Exchange programs
  • Career development opportunities

The SOBE Difference

Video player showing image of business students working together
  • Strong sense of belonging
  • Small student-centered classes
  • Be a name, not a number
  • Active student clubs and organizations
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Emphasis on real-world applications
  • Use of competitive simulations
  • Technology-intensive courses
  • Practical ethics training
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Be mentored by faculty
  • Meet with faculty outside of class
  • Student-faculty collaborative research opportunities
  • Strong academic support provided
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Alumni networking opportunities
  • Leadership development via experiential internships
  • International Exchange programs
  • Career development opportunities

The SOBE Difference

Video player showing image of business students working together
  • Strong sense of belonging
  • Small student-centered classes
  • Be a name, not a number
  • Active student clubs and organizations
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Emphasis on real-world applications
  • Use of competitive simulations
  • Technology-intensive courses
  • Practical ethics training
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Be mentored by faculty
  • Meet with faculty outside of class
  • Student-faculty collaborative research opportunities
  • Strong academic support provided
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Alumni networking opportunities
  • Leadership development via experiential internships
  • International Exchange programs
  • Career development opportunities

The SOBE Difference

Video player showing image of business students working together
  • Strong sense of belonging
  • Small student-centered classes
  • Be a name, not a number
  • Active student clubs and organizations
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Emphasis on real-world applications
  • Use of competitive simulations
  • Technology-intensive courses
  • Practical ethics training
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Be mentored by faculty
  • Meet with faculty outside of class
  • Student-faculty collaborative research opportunities
  • Strong academic support provided
Video player showing image of a student being interviewed
  • Alumni networking opportunities
  • Leadership development via experiential internships
  • International Exchange programs
  • Career development opportunities