Where does your food come from?

Monday February 22 2010

 

A series of films will examine our food, energy, and culture beginning February 25 with Food, Inc., which exposes the often shocking truth about what we eat. Each film begins at 6 p.m. in Hopwood Auditorium with a short discussion to follow.

The films, sponsored by the Lynchburg College Transition Group and Alliance For Energy Awareness (AFEA), are free and open to the public.

Food, Inc. February 25

Food, Inc. lifts the veil on our nation's food industry, exposing how our nation's food supply is controlled by a handful of corporations that often put profit ahead of consumer health, the livelihood of the American farmer, the safety of workers, and our own environment. Food, Inc. reveals surprising and often shocking truths about what we eat, how it's produced, and who we have become as a nation.

Power of Community March 17

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1990, Cuba's economy went into a tailspin. With imports of oil cut by more than half and food imports cut by 80 percent, people were desperate. This fascinating and empowering film shows how communities pulled together, created solutions, and ultimately thrived in spite of their decreased dependence on imported energy. In the context of global Peak Oil worries, Cuba is an inspiring vision of hope.

Coal Country March 31

Coal Country is a dramatic look at modern coal mining. We get to know working miners along with activists who are battling coal companies in Appalachia. We hear from miners and coal company officials, who are concerned about jobs and the economy and believe they are acting responsibly in bringing power to the American people. Both sides in this conflict claim that history is on their side. Families have lived in the region for generations, and most have ancestors who worked in the mines. Everyone shares a deep love for the land, but mountain top removal mining, which has leveled more than 500 Appalachian mountains, is tearing them apart. We need to understand the meaning behind promises of "cheap energy" and "clean coal." Are they achievable? At what cost? Are there alternatives to our energy future?

Idiocracy April 15

From Mike Judge, one of the creative minds behind Beavis and Butt-Head, King of the Hill and Office Space, comes an outrageous sci-fi comedy that'll make you think twice about the future of mankind. Meet Joe Bowers (Luke Wilson). He's not the sharpest tool in the shed. But when a government hibernation experiment goes awry, Bowers awakens in the year 2505 to find a society so dumbed-down by mass commercialism and mindless TV programming that he's become the smartest guy on the planet. Now it's up to an average Joe to get human evolution back on track.

No Impact Man April 28

Colin Beavan is a liberal schlub who got tired of listening to himself complain about the world without ever actually doing anything about it. Thus, in November 2006, Beavan launched a year-long project in which he, his wife, his 2-year-old daughter and his 4-year-old dog went off the grid and attempted to live in the middle of New York City with as little environmental impact as possible. The No Impact project has been the subject of stories in The New York Times, the Christian Science Monitor, and many other national and international news outlets. Beavan has appeared on The Colbert Report, Good Morning America, Nightline, The Montel Show, and all the major NPR shows. He speaks regularly to a wide variety of audiences and consults with business on the intersection of sustainability and human quality of life.